Introducing CollabNet GitEye

April 23, 2013 Mark Phippard

GitEye LogoToday I have the pleasure of announcing a new graphical client for Git that we have been working on — CollabNet GitEye.

GitEye is a Java GUI client for Git written on top of the Eclipse RCP framework. We are providing downloads for Windows, OSX and Linux though we can theoretically produce builds for a few other operating systems as well if the demand is there. Leveraging the Eclipse RCP framework allows us to provide a native GUI experience on all of these different operating systems, while still benefiting from the cross platform nature of Java. This approach also allows us to leverage a number of existing Eclipse plugins, such as EGit and our own CollabNet Desktop. That said, it is important to note for those that are IDE-averse, that using the Eclipse RCP framework does not mean we are using or repackaging the Eclipse IDE itself. We are simply building this client on the same low-level framework and libraries upon which the Eclipse IDE is built. A framework that we happen to think allows us to build an outstanding and highly functional Git client.

Enough of the low-level details, and more about GitEye. First off, GitEye is a full-featured Git client with all of the options you would expect in a graphical client. Most of the common Git actions are available from the GUI, such as clone, push, fetch, pull, merge, rebase, reset etc. There is a nice graphical view of your History and Annotations and there is a lot of tactical usage of git diff to provide context of changes within the UI as well as a full-blown graphical compare and merge tool. GitEye is a Git client, not an IDE, so the expectation is that you are using other tools and editors to work on your code. GitEye provides a simple text editor for making quick changes, but it also provides context-options to open up your Terminal or native File Manager to the selected location in your file system. You can also define custom commands which allows you to launch other tools. As an example, I work on OSX and use TextMate a lot. So I can right-click on folders or files and open them in TextMate to edit.

If these were all of the features of GitEye, it would be worthy of trying out, but really this is just scratching the surface of what is there. GitEye includes support for GitHub, including Pull Requests, Issues and Gists. All Git clients can presumably clone and push with GitHub, but we go well beyond that in our integration by providing native GUI support for these tools via the GitHub Eclipse plugin. Likewise, we have complete support for CloudForge and TeamForge and the agile planning tools in TeamForge. So besides being able to edit artifacts from within GitEye you can also use tools like the Agile Planning Board and Task Board from TeamForge. The GitHub and TeamForge tools are all built on top of the Eclipse Mylyn framework, so you also have the ability to install support for other trackers, such as Bugzilla, Trac and JIRA from within the application. Additional features that are included are support for Gerrit code reviews and Jenkins/Hudson build monitoring.

Keep your eyes open for future blog posts that describe these individual features in greater detail. Hopefully this was enough to entice you to want to try GitEye. You will be happy to learn that GitEye is Free. Learn more about the features and download it now here: http://www.giteyeapp.com

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