New ScrumMaster Tips

July 9, 2014 Terry Densmore

Team

I recently completed a blog on PMs transitioning to a ScrumMaster role.  I was inspired to put together a quick blog post for new ScrumMasters after reading a question that was posted to social media.  The poster basically wanted to know how to drive the team without them reporting to him/her or having “control” over them.  When I first read this I was perturbed but quickly thought to myself this person could be new to Agile and Scrum.  I’ll refer back to my definition of a ScrumMaster, a servant leader who is an Agile champion for your team.  I didn’t say management leader or controller or mother of dragons.

The ScrumMaster role is very challenging role and it takes some self control for people coming from a different role such as a PM or a lead from the team.  I am not a fan of “working” ScrumMasters, meaning they are also coders or leads.  They need to resist the urge to roll up their sleeves and dive in.  A good example of this, I was working on a Legos4Scrum (By Alexey Krivitsky) exercise acting as ScrumMaster.  Legos4Scrum is a cool way to introduce Scrum during an Agile bootcamp. You basically have teams working with sprints building items for a city while working with a product owner for vision of the city.  All the other teams had working ScrumMasters meaning they were diving in helping to build items such as schools and hotels for the city.  I was not building anything, instead I was separating the bricks, breaking bricks apart, sorting into colors etcetera making it easier for the team to build. Can you guess which team achieved a higher velocity? The team with a ScrumMaster who was constantly making the team’s job easier.  I was also working with product owner with any questions the team had as they were building. I tracked down the product owner if need be, not the team member working.  Do whatever you can to keep impediments down and efficiency high!

The servant leader side of the role is rewarding but being an Agile champion is crucial.  If you are new to the role start to soak up as much knowledge as you can.  At the end of the day you serve as the Agile coach for the team.  You should know the ceremonies and fun ways to facilitate them.  I highly recommend joining groups out there in internet land.  If you have a local Agile group join it, attend the meetings and share your experiences.  You will never stop learning.  Your knowledge and ways to handle situations builds trust with the team.

Another piece of advice I have is to provide a fun environment for your team.  Anything you can do to achieve this whether it is adding some cool posters or getting that energy drink fridge installed.  Try coming up with fun ways to do the standups and retrospectives.  If your team has the personality for it a prank doesn’t hurt from time to time.  Now remember don’t rewire the power switch on a PC to a remote power switch unless they can take a joke.  That was one of my favorite pranks I’ve ever been apart of.  Soft dart guns can also be very interesting on Friday afternoon.

I have only scratched the surface, this is a topic I could type for days on since I am very passionate about it.  That being said if you are a ScumMaster and have some tips please comment for those new ScrumMasters out there!

 

About the Author

Terry Densmore

Terry Densmore is a Product Manager at CollabNet VersionOne. Previously, Terry spent three years as an agile consultant on the Services team. He has introduced agile to multiple disciplines including software, mechanical, and electrical engineering teams. Terry also helped conquer the myth that agile cannot be as successful with distributed teams.

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