Subversion + Eclipse3.5 = Easy!

June 24, 2009 Mark Phippard

I added a post on my personal blog yesterday about support for Subversion being available for the just released Eclipse 3.5/Galileo release. Today I am going to show just how easy it is to install support for Subversion in Eclipse 3.5.

While I think that installing plugins in Eclipse is generally a pretty easy process, my views on this are colored by the fact that I have been doing it since before Eclipse 1.0 came out. That said, the Eclipse Mylyn team has made the process super-easy in the Eclipse 3.5 release.

I started by downloading one of the Eclipse packages from the download site. I chose the Eclipse IDE for Java Developers, just make sure you get one of the options that includes Mylyn.

After unzipping the bundle and starting Eclipse, look for the Mylyn Task List view and click on the New Task button as shown here:

Select New Task

This brings up the following Mylyn wizard. Note the new option to install more connectors:

Select New Task

After clicking the "Install More Connectors" button you are presented with a list of connectors that Mylyn can install. In the list of connectors that has been certified by Tasktop, you will see the CollabNet Desktop for SVN. The CollabNet Mylyn connectors, including Subclipse and our graphical merge client, have been certified by the team at Tasktop.  That means that these plugins play well with others and can be properly integrated into a number of Eclipse-based IDE's. Subclipse is the only Subversion plugin to have been certified by Tasktop.

Select New Task

I checked the box for the CollabNet Desktop for SVN and click Finish.

Three clicks, and I have started the process for installing Subversion support into Eclipse, it does not get much easier than that!

At this point, the rest is handled by the install magic from the Mylyn team. They run through the Eclipse install mechanism to verify and install your selections. I was doing this just after the launch of Eclipse 3.5 and I am sure the mirrors were getting hammered. Whatever the process does initially to validate the dependencies to verify the install took a few minutes, but eventually the following dialogs came up and it is just a matter of clicking through the wizard to complete the install. For completeness, here are those dialogs:

Confirm Selection

Confirm your selections and click Next:

Verify Components

I expanded the selection, so that you can see all of the components that will be installed.  You get the CollabNet Desktop, which allows you to connect to any CollabNet hosted site.  Subclipse, and its required components.  The Subversion revision graph feature that I have blogged about previously, and the CollabNet Merge client, which makes merging easy and powerful from the Eclipse environment.

Accept License

Accept the licenses. All of these products are free and open-source, licensed under the EPL.

Restart Eclipse

And finally, just click Yes to restart Eclipse.  That is it, not only do you have a working Subversion client in Eclipse, you have one with all of the bells and whistles as well as one that has been certified by Tasktop.

One Caveat!

The above install was done on Windows Vista 32-bit.  If you are running on another operating system, you must have the Subversion 1.6.x native libraries, including the JavaHL library available.  CollabNet provides an installer for OSX that includes this library, as well as a Linux client RPM that should work on any Linux distro.  Windows 64-bit users can install the SlikSVN package.  All of this information and more is available in this FAQ about JavaHL.

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